HOW ACCESS TO ATHLETES HAS CHANGED OVER TIME

New York Times sports reporter Gerald Eskenazi wrote:

My career as a New York Times sportswriter straddled two eras, from that time (1959) when reporters wore suits and fedoras and played poker with athletes on train rides, to the “modern” era of antiseptic locker rooms, timed interviews, and a respectful distance between player and writer. The players, meanwhile, have become millionaires. They don’t really need us. The writer? Not so poor, but not as rich, either. But we still need to talk to the players. We just don’t have the same easy rapport because there is virtually no real human interaction …

‘WRITING SHORT’ REQUIRES DISCIPLINE

“If I had more time, I would have written you a shorter letter.” – Mark Twain

The Paley Center for Media at Montclair State University School hosted “The New Sports Journalism: Opportunities and Conflicts,” a panel on the challenges of media access, social media and content aggregation.

At the conference, the panel all agreed that the next generation of journalists must “learn to do it all — shoot and edit video and audio, write short, master social media strategies and understand search engine optimization, analyze and present data and understand audiences.”

SPORTS MEDIA HONORS HISTORIC GAME ON ITS 50TH ANNIVERSARY

In celebration its 50th anniversary, ESPN will air Making History, a special 90-minute presentation of the historic 1966 NCAA title game between Texas Western and Kentucky tomorrow night at 7:30 p.m. with an encore on Sunday, April 3 at 11 a.m.

ESPN said the special “will contain every basket that took place” during the game and will also feature the original audio call of Claude Sullivan from the Cole Field House in College Park, Md. on March 19, 1966.